Wednesday, 11th November

The Russet

Hackney Downs Studios
17 Amhurst Terrace, London E8 2BT
7.30pm

Leave to Stay (Director: Awat Osman Ali)

London has a juxtaposition of cultures. People who live a million miles apart, in reality live next door to each other. Three Kurdish immigrants arrive in the UK, as illegal aliens to seek asylum and find that now they belong to London's underground. (64 minutes)

   


Emigrant (Director: Grant Taylor)

Emigration is the act of leaving one’s native country with the intent to settle elsewhere. Mikel, an emigrant to the United Kingdom, has a passion for games. His observations of the world around him and his relationship with his father lead him to create a game that will change the world. He gains inspiration from finding a bottle cap and develops an inclusive game that will inspire all, eventually helping him and his father bond. (4 minutes)

   


70 years Strong UN. Better World

This short video, produced by the UN, follows its development, featuring key events since the UN's creation.

   


A Question& Answer session will follow the screening. The Russet will be open all day so come early and enjoy its acclaimed food and bar snacks. Seating is limited.

Book your seats here



Thursday, 12th November

Hackney Picture House

270 Mare Street, London E8 1HE
8pm

Dance Up From The Street (Director: Peter Goldsmid)

In this inspirational documentary we meet-up with a successful Canadian choreographer who spends months of every year working with the street kids of Rwanda, orphans of one of the bloodiest episodes of ethnic cleansing since World War II. “Dance up from the Street” is the intimate, moving story of an alternative to life on the streets in a country still struggling to heal the wounds of genocide. Eric Mgwaneza is a 15 year old who has hopes for a brighter future and is inspired by Rebecca during one of her visits to Rwanda. In this compelling story we learn that dance moves truly transcend barriers of language, race and age and that dance might just be a way for him to realise his dreams. The young Rwandans learn not only contemporary dance, but also to connect with their own country’s dance tradition. Dance becomes a language of community discourse and a tool for personal liberation. (28 minutes)

   


Microphone (Director: Kareem Ghafur)

A child enters a mosque to urinate, but he is lost from his mother. The mother wants to go into the mosque to find her child, but she is not allowed. (9 minutes)

   


Elmando (Director: Anton Octavian)

The story of a young Congolese child, born near the forest of Kivu. (3 minutes)

   


The Silence of our friends (Director: Lina Lempianinen)

Elise is on her way to school parent-teacher night. Her daughter’s been involved in a bullying incident. Elise arrives late to find that the others have already started. To everyone’s surprise, the teacher has found an unusual way to convey the children’s situation. (10 minutes)

Nigeria, Edge of Joy

This UN-produced film tracks the situation in Nigeria which has the second highest number of maternal deaths in the world. More than thirty-six thousand women die here each year trying to have babies. But the country is beginning to fight back and slowly starting to see results. (3 minutes)

   


A speech follows the screening.

Book your seats here



Saturday, 14th November

Bernie Grant Arts Centre

Town Hall Approach Road, Tottenham Green
London N15 4RX
4 - 6pm

HUMAN RIGHTS: FIGHTING FOR "NORMALITY"
NORMALITY. What does it mean to you?
Cooking a meal with friends before fighting with the enemy? Running a barber shop in a refugee camp? Struggling through Europe from state to state searching for safety, security, and a welcoming place to rebuild a shattered life? Please join us FREE!, for two hours of thought-provoking film and discussion at a great little independent film screening venue in the heart of north London.

Kobani Under Siege (Director: Shirwan Ahmad)

A gripping documentary covering the filmmaker's return to the city of Kobani located on the border between Turkey and Syria at the time controlled 70% by ISIS. Even entering the city was considered impossible. (24 minutes)

   


Growing Home (Director: Faisal Attrache)

Amid Syria's refugee crisis that has displaced nine million people; a Syrian barber struggles to maintain normality in the Zaatari refugee camp. (22 minutes)

   


Akhtar: The Story of an Afghan Migrant

Migrating to another country in pursuit of safety and a better life has long been a way of coping with crisis; but for some, the quest can be tortuous and seemingly without end. For more than four years, the UN followed the story of one young Afghan migrant whose long journey has spanned continents...and shattered most of his dreams.


Three independent films focusing on issues of global conflict, displacement, forced migration, and complex issue of accessing basic human rights in ‘Fortress Europe’. After the final film there will be the chance for a short Q and A with a representative of the Islington Centre for Refugees and Migrants, a charity working with asylum seekers in London and whose patron is Juliet Stephenson.

Book your seats here



Monday, 16th November

BL-NK

25-27 Curtain Road
London EC2A 3LT
7pm

A Bird in A Cage (Project Manager: Amy Morris)

An animated film about Margaret Mackworth, otherwise known as Lady Rhondda, the important women’s rights campaigner throughout the first half of the 20th century. She set up the Newport Women’s Social and Political Union and founded one of the most influential political magazines of her day. She was imprisoned for attempting to blow up a postbox in Newport for the cause of women’s suffrage. Her work had a lasting impact on the democratic landscape of South Wales. (19 minutes)

   


Repercussions (Director: Aren Devlin)

In the aftermath of 2011’s London riots the story focuses on Jade a single mum, whose life unravels due to poor judgement and untimely events. She seeks redemption, but at what cost. (19 minutes)

   


The Piano (Director: Levon Minasian)

Thirteen years after the Armenian city of Leninakan was destroyed in an earthquake, Loussiné, a 13 year old orphan lives with her grandfather in a "domik" – a prefabricated small house. She is dumb, but a talented pianist. To prepare for an international competition, the Ministry of Culture lends her a beautiful piano. But when the instrument is delivered, it’s clear that the trailer where they live is too small to hold a piano…(27 minutes)

   


Liberia: Women on the frontline

This UN-produced film about Liberia, a country which has been engulfed in war with its women bearing the brunt of the conflict. When peace finally did come, the legacy of violence against women continues to haunt the country. But Liberia's women are now taking positions of power and filling roles usually dominated by men. And it's making a difference.

   


A Question & Answer session will follow the screening.

Book your seats here



Tuesday, 17th November

Love Die Late

114 Great Portland Street
London W1W 6PH
7pm

7 Days in Syria (Director: Robert Rippberger)

The film gives a window into the lives of families struggling to survive on the frontlines of the Syria conflict. Their courage and resilience shines through in impossible circumstances. Newsweek Middle East editor, Janine di Giovanni, submitted a proposal to cover the war in Syria. The magazine denied the request, deeming the situation too dangerous. She decided to go anyway. Angelina Jolie said of the film, "7 Days in Syria gives a window into the lives of families struggling to survive on the frontlines of the Syria conflict. Their courage and resilience shines through in impossible circumstances." (75 minutes)

   


UN Film
Palestine: Bread-winner, Bread-maker

This UN film depicts a land torn apart by years of bitter conflict, the daily struggle to survive is an on-going battle. Feeding the family is a constant effort. But some inspirational women in the Occupied Palestinian territories are bring hope to thousands. (Running time: 4:16)

   


The evening will finish with a Q and A.

Book your seats here



Tuesday, 17th November

LSE, London School of Economics and Political Science

Lecture Theatre
Houghton St, London
WC2A 2AE
6:15 - 8pm

Please join us for a free, unforgettable evening of thought-provoking and inspiring short films, conversation and refreshments at London School of Economics and Political Science.

The evening is open to LSE students only and will consist of two independent films focused around issues connected with the United Nations Three Pillars of Freedom and a video celebrating its 70th anniversary, followed by a Q & A session. We look forward to seeing you there.

The following films will be screened:

When You Can’t see the film (Director Details -Yijun He)

Largely due to censorship, many films, especially documentaries and independent films can't be released in China. But underground cinema clubs are making independent films accessible to Chinese audience despite the all the risks.

   


GastroNomads (Director: Annebel Huijboom)

This film explores issues of migration, belonging and food preferences in the specific context of five migrant women from different parts of the world, now living in London. They all work for Mazí Mas, a roaming restaurant that creates employment opportunities for migrant and refugee women, inviting them to cook food from their own countries, as they were taught by their mothers and grandmothers. Is there a difference between cooking food at home and in this role as representatives from their home country? (20 minutes)

   


Celebrating the UN Charter (5 mins)
Take a trip to the birthplace of the UN Charter where the UN's founding principles were commemorated seventy years later to the day.

A Question & Answer session with the Director will follow the screening.

Eventbrite



Wednesday, 18th November

School of Oriental & African Studies

Djam Lecture Theatre
Thornhaugh Street
London WC1H 0EL
7pm

70 years Strong UN. Better World

This short video, produced by the UN, follows its development, featuring key events since the UN's creation.

   


Growing Home (Director: Faisal Attrache)

Amid Syria's refugee crisis that has displaced nine million people; a Syrian barber struggles to maintain normality in the Zaatari refugee camp. (22 minutes)

   


Libya, the Migrant Trap (Director: Veronique Mauduy)

For African migrants Libya used to be a Mecca: a place to find work or get access to Europe. But now the workers who come here are trapped in the political, economic and social chaos engulfing the country. (26 mins)

   


Black Ulysses (Director: Federica D’lppolito)

Hope fades when the migrants arrived in Italy, and specifically in Nardò, Lecce province, are having to submit to the harsh laws of illegal hiring, live in the reality of the territory. (4mins)

The Bound Free Spirit (Director: Ritika Jajodia)

This film highlights the refugee community of Tibet in the national capital of India, Delhi, describing and presenting both sides of the coin in the bound and free Tibet. (3 mins)

A Q & A session will follow the screening to be joined by the film makers and others who work in the field.

Book your seats here



Saturday, 21st November

BFI South Bank

London SE1 8XT
From 10am

Book your seats here

This free event is a great opportunity for those aged 15 -30 to see exciting, funny and powerful films from around the world and discuss the issues raised with those who made them as well as meet industry experts including John Glen, Director of six ‘James Bond’ films and who had a hand in Superman and The Italian Job.

Also, join a Master Class led by filmmakers and get hands-on experience in production. And sit in with our panel of judges when they pick the 2015 #TweetAPitch winner.

The event is part of the We The Peoples Film Festival, a project of the United Nations Association Westminster Branch. Films shown tackle issues linked to the United Nations Three Pillars of freedom; freedom from want, freedom from fear and the freedom to live in dignity.

Programme

1000 Registration

1015 NFT3 World Premiere: Exploiting It? ( 2014 #TweetAPitch winner, Director: Jade Jackman, Producer: Aleksandra Bilic, Director of Photography: Nadira Amrani)

It is a short, immersive, creative documentary. As you descend into a house in England, you’ll find media devices coming alive with the real experiences of women who's identities have become constant source of intrigue and horror.

Exploiting It? is a short documentary that explores the effects of Islamophobia on women and the fetishisation of the Muslim woman. Some of the liberal justification for the contemporary persecution of Muslims is the common perception that their faith oppresses women. However, through the perspective of our participants, one is able to see where their self censorship comes from and where their freedom of expression is really curtailed. 

With many of the participants expressing that they feel that there is one narrative afforded them by the mainstream media, the short film raises the question of who is really free to create and whether people have any choice but to accept the identities offered to them by hungry consumers. Furthermore, this short film offers an insight into how governmental legislation, such as Prevent and the Counter Terrorism and Security Bill, is seeping into intended areas of life and institutionalising racist stereotypes.

The film will be followed by a Question & Answer session with the director Jade Jackman, the producer Aleksandra Bilic and the Director of Photography Nadira Amrani. They will also be joined by the artist Sarah Maple and the writer Ruqaiya Haris.

1100 Decision Time! You have three options
NFT3 A Syrian Love Story (Director: Sean McAllister) Filmed over 5 years, the film charts an incredible odyssey to political freedom in the West. For Raghda and Amer, it is a journey of hope, dreams and despair: for the revolution, their homeland and each other.
See the trailer here.
   

Small Theatre Film-making Masterclass 1: Film-making and Collaboration
Ludovica Fales and Isis Thompson will explain how they made the documentary The Real Social Network as a collaborative project.
Blue Room Film-making Masterclass 2: Esteban Uyuarra
1245 Lunch Break
1330 Award-winning short films
Play Date (Director: Sepideh Borjinia) In the Middle East, some children mistake bombs with toys and take them out to play.

   

Bang! Bang! (Director: Alejandro Castro) A small boy learns how dangerous his imagination can really be in this quirky short.

   

The Red House (Director: Jiaqi Lin) The moving story of Fangfang, a prostitute, struggles to buy her freedom…her plans change when her child is sold to the house by her parent.

   

Bayberries have ripened (Director: Niranjan Rajbhetwal) Set during the Nepal Civil war, two brothers take their cow for fertilization. As the boys bring back the cow, worshiped as a mother and giver, they are faced with a new realization.

   

Horseface (Director: Marc Martínez Jordan) A self-described “Comedy-Horror-Science Fiction-Thriller Animal Drama” short from Spain starring the director and his grandma!

   

These films will be followed by a Question & Answer session with leading experts including John Glen, Director of five ‘James Bond’ films.
1500 #TweetAPitch final play-off The six finalists will pitch their film ideas to a panel of judges including John Glen and Jade Jackman, Director of Exploiting.
1600 Best Film Awards and 2015 #Tweeterpitch Award
1630 Networking and post-event party
1900 Close


   



Monday, 23rd November

The Harrison

28 Harrison Street
London WC1H 8JF
7.30pm

Four films which draw attention to issues surrounding the United Nations’ Three Pillars of Freedom: freedom from want, freedom from fear and the freedom to live in dignity.

Sometimes I’m afraid, Sometimes I hit (Director: Yuval Auron)

The people of Nabi Saleh, in the West Bank, have been holding weekly protests against the Israeli occupation for four years. Through a series of interviews with the village's children, we learn of their unique and personal perspective of the struggle: how they cope with the constant state of violence around them, as they see their parents being arrested and family members being killed, and if and when they see some hope in their situation. (14 minutes)

   


Hebron is Beautiful (Director: Yuvall Orr)

On a hilltop in the city of Hebron, where the banality of everyday life clashes with the absurdity of occupation, fifteen-year old Awni Abu Shamsiya attempts to maintain a sense of normalcy as he goes about his daily routine. (9 minutes)

   


Across The Tracks (Director: Catherine Feltham)

As the Clean India campaign gets underway, with its ambitious target of a toilet for every household by 2019, WaterAid explores how something as simple as a toilet can help transform lives by following the story of one ambitious mother in Uttar Pradesh. Radha Verma, determined to protect her daughter after she narrowly escapes a physical attack, builds one of the first toilets in Rakhi Mandi slum, home to 3,500 people in one of India’s largest cities – Kanpur. The film shows how Radha Verma has made this happen with the support of others in and around the community. We meet charismatic “super-gran” Kalavati and passionate community leader, Laddan. With support from WaterAid’s local partner, Shramik Bharti, they educate, inspire and motivate others to build. (18 minutes)

   


The Journey of Women's Rights

A short film taking you through the evolution of the Women’s Rights movement from 1945 until now, shown as part of the United Nation’s 70th anniversary. (2 minutes)

   


A Question & Answer session to include a representative of WaterAid will follow the screening.

Book your seats here



Sunday, 29th November

Lights of Soho

35 Brewer Street
London W1F 0RX
4pm


I'm not here (Director: Ashvin Kumar)

Commissioned by the UN, this film documents the lives of female undocumented immigrants working in domestic slavery across the world. (28 mins)



   


The Roma: Road to inclusion (UN Media)

The Roma - known around the world as Gypsies. Theirs’ is a long and painful history of being excluded...often denied their rights. And that discrimination continues today, forcing many to live in poverty.  Here is one extraordinary group of Roma fighting to ensure that painful legacy ends with them. Here's their story. (10 minutes)



   


GastroNomads (Director: Annebel Huijboom)

This film explores issues of migration, belonging and food preferences in the specific context of five migrant women from different parts of the world, now living in London. They all work for Mazí Mas, a roaming restaurant that creates employment opportunities for migrant and refugee women, inviting them to cook food from their own countries, as they were taught by their mothers and grandmothers. Is there a difference between cooking food at home and in this role as representatives from their home country? (20 minutes).



   


Mount Gourougou (Director Bruno Rocchi)

A triple wire mesh, motion sensors and security cameras protect the city of Melilla, a Spanish enclave in Moroccan territory, against illegal entry. The documentary highlights the desperate conditions that hundreds of Sub-Saharan migrants experience in Gourougou mountain, near the city of Melilla. These people wait the chance to get a permit for Europe and cross the border, at the mercy of Moroccan police and its violence and oppression. (10 minutes)



   


A Question & Answer session will follow the screening.

Book your seats here

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